whales in New York

Fox 5: Mystery of Dying Whales Concerns Scientists

Fox 5 NY's Jodi Goldberg met Atlantic Marine Conservation Society chief scientist Rob DiGiovanni at Jones Beach to talk about the recent whale deaths in New York and what he and his fellow scientists are working to uncover.

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Scientists are searching for answers about why humpback whales are dying at an unprecedented rate along the Atlantic Coast.

"Having six animals come up in six months is something that we haven't seen in years," said Rob DiGiovanni, the founder of the Atlantic Marine Conservation Society. "Between May and June, we had four animals come up in a 30-day period." 

Watch the interview and find the story here.

The New Yorker: Spying on Whales to Save Them

One foggy morning last April, a dead humpback whale washed up on New York’s Rockaway Beach. It was a young male, thirty-one feet long, and had extensive bruising—the result of contact with “something very large,” according to Kimberly Durham, of the Atlantic Marine Conservation Society, who performed the necropsy. The Rockaway whale was one of sixty-eight humpbacks that have died between North Carolina and Maine since 2016, casualties in what the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is calling an “unusual mortality event.” And humpbacks, it turns out, are not the only species suffering. Last August, noaa declared another unusual mortality event, this time for North Atlantic right whales: eighteen of the endangered animals have died recently. Then, in January, the agency announced that minke whales were getting stranded, too: twenty-one have died. The occurrence of three simultaneous and ongoing cetacean mortality events along the East Coast is not just unusual; it is unprecedented.

Read the full story online here.